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Publications

Dance of the Avatar : Embodying Gender and Culture through Dance by Imre Lázár Nova Science Pbl. New York

”Dance of the Avatar” is a comprehensive work and includes cultural studies and anthropology of revival movements from a historical perspective; it is focused on the Dance House phenomenon, which includes gender and ethnic aspects from a cultural and medical anthropological context. This book deals with the theory of tradition and cultural transfer of heritage through pedagogy and counter-culture movements, with an emphasis on the the Wundtian contribution and its Hungarian counterparts. The Dance House phenomenon is presented through an auto-anthropological perspective, including the author's field work results.


Attached Files
Anthropological Essays on Body, Psyche, Attachment and Spirituality
Author(s): Imre Lázár Subject: Geography, Anthropology, Recreation
URL: cambridgescholars-staging.stsdgl.net/attached-files

“Attached Files” is a selection of lectures and papers written by Imre Lázár, a medical anthropologist with twenty-five years of experience, situated at the crossroads and frontiers of several disciplines, including anthropology, health sciences, religious studies, human ecology, and environmental ethics. The shared focus, connecting these borderlands into a common semantic network, is the problem of the synergic logic of human bonds and attachment embodied by somatic, social, institutional and symbolic structures. The first part of the book deals with pluralism and the enculturation of the medical practice and its anthropological perspectives. The concept of attachment, metaphorized by the title, also provides a common ground to envisage cultural history, philosophy, literature, and biomedical sciences in terms of synergic human agency and its obstacles. >> Read more at Cambridge Scholars Publishing